LUVCELEBS

Daily meet celebrity with new activity

like


Lisa Opie
Country England
ResidenceEngland
Born (1963-08-15) 15 August 1963 (age 55)
Guernsey Guernsey
Turned Pro1984
Retired1995
PlaysRight Handed
Women's singles
Highest rankingNo. 1 (March 1988)
Last updated on: 3 March 2010.

Lisa Opie MBE (born on 15 August 1963) is a retired British squash player, who was one of the game's leading woman players in the 1980s and early-1990s. Her biggest successes were winning the British Open in 1991 and four consecutive World Team Championships from 1985 to 1990. Until the rise of Cassie Campion she was England's number 1 player.

Born and raised in Guernsey, she was coached in her early years in the game by Reg Harbour.[1][2] In international competition, she represented England. She was awarded an MBE for services to squash in the 1995 New Year's Honours List.[3][4] In later years she was coached by Gavin Dupre from Jersey. They began working together in Guernsey and Lisa later spent time training with him in Germany where he was based as a professional coach.

Contents

  • 1 Playing career
  • 2 World Open
    • 2.1 Finals: 2 (0 title, 2 runners-up)
  • 3 British Open
    • 3.1 Finals: 5 (1 title, 4 runners-up)
  • 4 World Team Championships
    • 4.1 Finals: 6 (4 titles, 2 runner-up)
  • 5 References
  • 6 External links

Playing career[edit]

Lisa won her first tournament in 1979 and quickly established herself as one of the game's best players. She reached the 1981 World Open semi-final but lost to Rhonda Thorne 9–2, 9–0, 9–4. This was to be the first in a series of near-misses for Lisa, as she reached two World Open finals but lost both times to the New Zealand squash legend Susan Devoy – in 1985 (9–4, 9–5, 10–8) and 1987 (9–3, 10–8, 9–2).

The British Open also provided much heartbreak. In 1982 and 1983 she lost in the final against Vicki Cardwell, and then against old foe Devoy again in 1984 (5–9, 9–0, 9–7, 9–1) and 1986 (9–4, 9–2, 9–3). However, she eventually won the British Open in 1991 when she beat compatriot Sue Wright in the final 6–9, 9–3, 9–3, 9–4. This made her the first British woman to win the title for 30 years. That same year she finished second in the Sports Journalists Award, with the athlete Liz McColgan coming first.[5]

World Open[edit]

Finals: 2 (0 title, 2 runners-up)[edit]

Outcome Year Location Opponent in the final Score in the final
Runner-up 1985 Women's World Open Squash Championship Dublin, Ireland New Zealand Susan Devoy 9–4, 9–5, 10–8
Runner-up 1987 Women's World Open Squash Championship Auckland, New Zealand New Zealand Susan Devoy 9–3, 10–8, 9–2

British Open[edit]

Finals: 5 (1 title, 4 runners-up)[edit]

Outcome Year Location Opponent in the final Score in the final
Runner-up 1982 Women's British Open Squash Championship Bromley, England Australia Vicki Cardwell 9–4, 5–9, 9–4, 9–4
Runner-up 1983 Women's British Open Squash Championship Derby, England Australia Vicki Cardwell 9–10, 9–6, 9–4, 9–5
Runner-up 1984 Women's British Open Squash Championship Wembley, England New Zealand Susan Devoy 5–9, 9–0, 9–7, 9–1
Runner-up 1986 Women's British Open Squash Championship Wembley, England New Zealand Susan Devoy 9–4, 9–2, 9–3
Winner 1991 Women's British Open Squash Championship London, England England Sue Wright 6–9, 9–3, 9–3, 9–4

World Team Championships[edit]

Finals: 6 (4 titles, 2 runner-up)[edit]

Outcome Year Location Opponent in the final Score in the final
Winner 1985 Women's World Team Squash Championships Dublin, Ireland New Zealand New Zealand 2–1
Winner 1987 Women's World Team Squash Championships Auckland, New Zealand Australia Australia 2–1
Winner 1989 Women's World Team Squash Championships Warmond, Netherlands Australia Australia 3–0
Winner 1990 Women's World Team Squash Championships Sydney Australia Australia 2–1
Runner-up 1981 Women's World Team Squash Championships Toronto, Canada Australia Australia 2–1
Runner-up 1983 Women's World Team Squash Championships Perth, Australia Australia Australia 2–1